PASSIVE RESISTANCE

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The Indians in South Africa

South Africa herself belongs rightly to the West. It was from the countries of Europe that her early settlers came, yet it is significant that she first attracted public attention as a possible half-way house between East and West.

Indians and their South African Compatriots

IN the December issue of THE ROUND T ABLE appeared a brief description of the five points of the Indians' claim in South Africa, with the intimation that the trouble which had been brewing for a considerable time previously had come to a head in the shape of a renewal of passive resistance.

Indians in the Colonies and Indians in S A

Articles in the journal of the The Indian Review

You and the Indians

Foreword
The Indian question is a burning issue to-day. It is difficult enough to solve without the added evils of boycotts and racial hatred now being deliberately instigated by certain political and business elements.

Indian Opinion No.1 - Vol 38. Friday, 5th January 1940

Indian Opinion No.1 - Vol 38. Friday, 5th January 1940

Our plucky sisters resist” Indian Women and the Passive Resistance Campaign of 1913

During the first half of the 20th century, Indian women, were at the forefront of protest politics: the 1913 and 1946 passive resistance strikes, and the Defiance campaign of 1952 are examples of women’s courageous and bold participation. Yet, we know very little about their activities.

Monty ... Meets Gandhi ... meets Mandela: The dilemma of non-violent resisters in South Africa, 1940-1960

This article focuses on key moments in the life of Doctor G.M. "Monty" Naicker (1911-1978), an Edinburgh-educated medical doctor and contemporary of Yusuf Dadoo, who displaced moderate elements in Indian politics in South Africa when he became president of the Natal Indian Congress 1946.

Passive Resistance in Natal 1946-48

Natal Indian Congress (N.I.C.), after a prolonged struggle, in October 1945.

INDIAN OPINION 1950-1961

Indian Opinion, a weekly newspaper, was first established and produced by Mohandas Gandhi ("Mahatma"), M.H. Nazar and Madanjit Viyavaharik in 1903 in the Natal Province. The newspaper focused on Indian rights, poor living conditions of indentured labourers and racial discrimination.

"Ghandi"
Duality in Non-Violence
Indian Opinion Vol.48 No.36 Sep 1950
Indian Opinion Vol.49 No.38 Sep 1951
Indian Opinion Vol.49 No.39 Sep 1951
Indian Opinion Vol.50 No.35 Sep 1952
Indian Opinion Vol.50 No.36 Sep 1952
Indian Opinion Vol.50 No.37 Sep 1952
Indian Opinion Vol.50 No.38 Sep 1952
Indian Opinion Vol.51 No.36 Sep 1953
Indian Opinion Vol.51 No.37 Sep 1953

Pages

550 records found.